Friday, December 06, 2013

Old Cincinnati Voted Last Month

It is quite clear who voted last month in the City Election based on age:
People Aged 18 to 43 made up 26.48% of the Electorate
People Aged 44 and up made of 74.52% of the Electorate
Compare that to Registered Voters:
People Aged 18 to 43 made up 52.98% of Registered Voters
People Aged 44 and up made of 47.02% of the Registered Voters
Turnout rates grew by decade backwards to the 1930's with around 58% turnout for those born during the depression. People born in the 1950's, the Baby Boomers, made up 25% of the electorate, even though they make up only about 15% of registered voters.

Irony: Far more people who were alive when Cincinnati was still paying off the Subway voted, than those not born after. Their ignorance is largely responsible for allowing Cranley and his Cabal damage our City. I thought wisdom was supposed to come with age?

7 comments:

  1. I see a lot of aging people (around 60) who are very afraid of change and change seems to be coming at us faster every day.
    When I was a kid, young people fought for the right to vote & succeeded in lowering the voting age. The apathy of younger people today is sad.
    Maybe we need to implement a draft again...

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  2. You have had multiple blog posts that seem to be blaming the electorate. With all due respect, I think that this is a very misguided line of thinking. The blame lies squarely with the Qualls campaign and the local democratic party. And as painful as it may be, Cranley deserves credit where credit is due for working hard on the campaign trail and running a very shrewd campaign strategy. The Qualls campaign put forth a pathetic effort in my view and this is not revisionist history as I believe I posted my opinion right here on this blog prior to the election. It is time to start assigning blame appropriately. It is the job of a politician to convince an electorate and Cranley got the job done.

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    1. Maybe BOTH deserve a bit of blame. The Tea Party gets out the vote. They organize. They support their candidates. The problem with "progressives" and Democrats in general is that the party represents an electorate that can't/won't be bothered to vote. PS: I'm a Democrat.

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  3. I'm 56 and voted for Qualls and would vote for her again. It should be said that I do resent being reduced to an ageist stereotype. Why didn't the younger people vote? I kept wondering when Roxanne was going to put on her gloves against the lies from the other side, but it didn't happen. While most of my social media sphere were squarely for Qualls, that message clearly didn't get beyond the choir. I talked to several people who didn't vote, and their reasoning seemed to consist of not liking either candidate (at which point I'd ask them is they might consider voting for the lesser of two evils). It was and is a horrifying result. Off year elections are often the most important, that's why we can never take our eyes off the ball. Every election matters. Hopefully some of the younger folks who didn't vote this time will have learned a lesson in civic engagement.

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    1. I had an interesting conversation at lunch today with two 20 something guys, both active in politics. I said something about off-year elections and the one immediately said, we need to stop using that term. His point was that there are no "off years" in elections - every election is important and the sooner people get to that belief, the better off we'll be. I'm like you, I'm not sure I've ever missed a vote; if I did, it was a rare one. I'm glad to hear these two young men calling me out on my use of the term. We had a bad result in 2010 and we had a bad result this year. Everyone must vote because every election is important. Thanks for the reminder too.

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  4. I'm old. I voted for change. I voted for Cranley.

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    Replies
    1. And you are a Republican, so you support my point.

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Don't be an idiot or your post will be deleted.